Jan 22, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Listings


SUNY Oneonta offers students more than 1,400 courses—from Accounting to Zoology—from over 25 separate departments. Requirements for majors and minors and course descriptions are listed under the departments that offer them, and these departments are arranged in alphabetical order.

Please note that requirements, courses, and course descriptions are subject to change after publication of this catalog. Contact the appropriate departments for updated information. 

Key to Course Listings

Abbreviation   Meaning
(LA)   Liberal Arts (course is a Liberal Arts offering)
OCS   Oral Communication Skills
SUSF   Sustainability Focused Courses
s.h.   Semester Hour(s)
SoS   Sophomore standing
JrS   Junior standing
SrS   Senior standing

Course Numbering System

001 - 099   No credit; usually developmental in nature.
100 - 199   Lower-division undergraduate-level courses.
200 - 299   Upper-division intermediate undergraduate-level courses.
300 - 399   Upper-division advanced courses.
500 - 699   Graduate-level courses.
 

European History

  
  •  

    EHIS 213 - History of World War I 3 s.h.


    This course will examine the origins, causes, impact, and aftermath of World War One from the European perspective. Primary documents will be an integral component of the course. Subjects will include women, the home fronts, literature and art, the media, life in the trenches, war-time economies, and the post-war treaties. A-E Only. Offered Spring only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 214 - Europe from Napoleon to WWI 3 s.h.


    A survey of social, cultural, and political developments in Europe after the Napoleonic Era. Topics include Victorianism, the wars and revolutions of the century, the rise of nationalism and scientific racism, and the spiraling crisis of the pre-WWI years. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    WC3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 215 - Medieval Medicine 3 s.h.


    The aim of this course is to introduce students to a wide range of medieval health issues, social attitudes, texts, and daily practices. Students will be encouraged to engage in close study of primary sources in translation. This course is designed to be comparative, covering a broad chronological range from Ancient Greek foundations through the Black Death and a wide geographic range including Scandinavian, Continental European, and Middle Eastern medicine. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or HIST 100  
  
  •  

    EHIS 218 - The Nazi State 3 s.h.


    An in-depth analysis of the creation and functioning of the Nazi State from 1933-1945. Includes examinations of the Volksgemeinschaft, propaganda, women, youth, racism, war, the role of Hitler. A-E Only. Offered Spring only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 220 - War and Society in Modern Britain 3 s.h.


    This course is a thematic exploration of the impact of war on British society throughout the twentieth century. Students will study the impact of the Boer War, the First and Second World Wars and the Falklands conflict on Britain. Attention will be paid to how war affected British culture, politics, gender and class relations as well as Britain's economy and relationship with its Empire. A special theme will be the interaction of war and social change. Students will consider how Britain's great power status, the evolution of the welfare state, as well as its level of democratization, and the position of trade unions were shaped by wartime conflict in the twentieth century. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100 level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 222 - Germany: The Rise of the Nazis 3 s.h.


    A study of German History from the Wilhemine period of the 1890s to the Nazi seizure of power in 1933. Includes the impact of WWI, the structure and problems of the Weimar Republic, and the rise of the radical right. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 223 - Tsarist Russia 3 s.h.


    A study of Russian history from 862 AD through the Communist revolution of 1917. A post-Soviet approach which recognizes that the tsarist era is the longest and (perhaps) the most significant epoch in Russian history. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 225 - Monarchs, Witches, & Heretics - Tudor & Stuart England, 1485-1714 3 s.h.


    This course examines the evolution of England from a medieval society to an identifiable modern nation state. Students will study how evolution, revolution and the Reformation fundamentally altered medieval institutions such as the monarchy, Parliament and the Church. Special attention will also be paid to the changing position of women in English society. Topics include the War of the Roses, the end of feudalism, the establishment of the Tudor State, the Wars of Religion, the Spanish Armada, witchcraft and society, the foundation of a worldwide empire, the English Civil War, Puritanism, the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and the change from an absolute to a constitutional monarchy. The policies and personalities of the colorful monarchs of the time (and their public images) will also play a key role in the course. Memorable monarchs coverd include Henry VIII (and his six wives), "Bloody Mary"(Mary I) "Gloriana" (Elizabeth I), Charles I and "the Merry Mon-arch" (Charles II). Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 226 - Imperialism to the Beatles - Modern Britain, 1714–Present 3 s.h.


    This course will study British history from 1714 to the present. It will focus on the world's first industrial revolution, the emergence of British parliamentary democracy, the rise of Britain as major industrial power with a global empire in the nineteenth century and its decline in the twentieth century. A special theme in this course will be the evolution of the British sense of identity during three centuries of continuous social, political, economic and cultural change. Topics to be discussed will include the rise and decline of the aristocracy; the exploitation of the working classes and its resistance to industrialism; working-class culture; the struggle for parliamentary reform; the family, and men and women's sex roles; the struggle for women's rights; the growth of the British empire; the importance of imperialism to British society and culture; the world wars; the rise of mass consumerism; the Great Depression; the impact of the enfranchisement of women; the rise of the Labour Party, decolonization; the post- 1945 consensus; the Thatcher Revolution and New Labour. Pass/Fail Option. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 230 - From Anarchism to Fascism: European Ideas and Ideologies 3 s.h.


    A survey of major ideas and ideologies in European history from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Topics include: the history of European left, right, and centrist movement and parties, liberalism, conservatism, radicalism, feminism, anarchism, socialism, communism, facism, Nazism, and works by Rousseau, Marx, Lenin, Hitler and others. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Spring only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 234 - British Imperial Experience 3 s.h.


    The British Empire has had a lasting effect on the world. The English language, the Protestant religion, the movement of peoples through migration and slavery, the system of capitalism, English ideas of law and political rights and even English sports have all been spread around the world by the British Empire. "The British Imperial Experience" will examine the history of British Empire from 1750 to the present. Students will learn about the economic, cultural, political and military impact of the British Empire on the modern world and Britain itself. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 sh 100 level HIST.
  
  •  

    EHIS 235 - History of the Holocaust 3 s.h.


    This course examines the history of the Holocaust from a broad historical perspective. Topics include: exploration of the history of antisemitism; Nazi ideology; the rise of Nazi Germany; the planning and realization of genocide; and the recovery of the Jewish community in the post-war world. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 240 - Boys to Men: European Masculinities 3 s.h.


    This course will analyse the roles of boys and men in European society, politics and war, as well as investigate representations of men and maleness in the European past. It aims at directing students' attention to gender history as a useful tool for approaching European history, sharpening their research, analytical and writing skills, and encouraging reflections on social and cultural aspects of early modern and modern Europe. Students will investigate developments in the domestic, societal, political and military roles of men as part of wider trends in European history, such as the growth of the European middle classes, changes to family and state structures, transformations in education, and the rise of European empires. There will also be sessions on developments in male manners and fashions, and on transformations in male sociability, friendship and sexuality. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    Cross-listed as: WMST 240 .
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 241 - History of Police 3 s.h.


    Through the investigation of primary and secondary sources, students will gain an understanding of the history of the European police, with occasional insights into parallel global developments in police history. We will look at policing before the police, at the creation of the modern police in the long eighteenth century, including the Police Nationale in France, the City of Glasgow Police and the Metropolitan Police, at different policing models that emerged, at political and secret policing, at the history of the detective and the rise of scientific criminology, and at policing in the two World Wars and beyond. This course also proposes a discussion of Allan Pinkerton, the son of a Glasgow policeman who founded the Pinkerton National Detective Agency in Chicago, in the context of the rise of early private detective agencies, including that of Eugène-François Vidocq. A-E Only. Offered every 3 years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. of 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 248 - The Dutch Golden Age 3 s.h.


    At the height of its power in the seventeenth century, a small, marshy country called the Dutch Republic dominated European trade and administered an empire that stretched around the globe. In this course we will try to explain the Dutch Golden Age and, in doing so, we will study the notion of  "modernity": economic, religious, and political. Topics include the Dutch Revolt and Dutch state, financial institutions and innovations, religious tolerance, science and art, the East and West India Companies, global encounters, and so on. Though a class on the Dutch might seem fairly narrow, they lived and worked almost everywhere. Students interested in any part of the early modern world—Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas—and students interested in broad themes like nationalism, capitalism, and globalization are invited to explore them in this course. A-E Only. Offered every two years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  
  •  

    EHIS 294 - Special Topics in European History 1 s.h. - 3 s.h.


    Group studies on aspects of European History under faculty supervision. A-E Only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.

English Literature

  
  •  

    ELIT 200 - English Literature – Beginnings to Early Renaissance 3 s.h.


    Survey of literature of England from the medieval and Renaissance periods. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 201 - English Literature – Renaissance to 18th Century 3 s.h.


    Survey of literature of England from the Renaissance through the 18th century. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 202 - English Literature – 18th Century to Present 3 s.h.


    Survey of literature of England from the 18th century to the present. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 217 - 19th Century English Novel 3 s.h.


    A survey of the Romantic and Victorian novel, from authors such as Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, and Hardy. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 ; LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 240 - Medieval English Literature 3 s.h.


    Readings in modern English translation of outstanding medieval prose and poetry. Includes Beowulf, Authurian legend, lyrics, drama, romances, selections from Chaucer, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and sagas. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 ; LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 241 - The English Renaissance 3 s.h.


    Readings in English literature from the 15th to the 17th centuries. Selections from the works of such representative writers as Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100  and LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 242 - Staging the Renaissance 3 s.h.


    This course explores the wide-range of English Renaissance drama, excluding Shakespeare. We will read plays written by Christopher Marlowe, Elizabeth Cary, Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson, John Webster, and Mary Wroth. In addition to reading and discussing plays in depth, we will consider how the stage both reflected and participated in major cultural changes occurring in Early Modern England. A-E Only. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): LITR 100  or LITR 150 , ELIT 270 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ELIT 243 - 18th-Century English Literature 3 s.h.


    A survey of selected poetry, prose, and drama, with emphasis on satirists. Readings from authors such as Dryden, Defoe, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Boswell, and Blake, as well as early newspaper writers, biographers, and novelists. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 , and LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 245 - British Writers of the Romantic Age 3 s.h.


    Study of the poetry and prose of the major Romanticists of the early nineteenth century. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 , and LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 246 - Victorian Literature 3 s.h.


    Great works of British prose and poetry from 1832 to 1901. Includes selections from major poets such as the Brownings, Tennyson, Arnold, or the Rossettis, as well as novels by authors such as Dickens, George Eliot, Bram Stoker and the Brontes. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 , and LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 247 - 20th-Century English Writers 3 s.h.


    English novels, short stories, plays, and poetry written in the 20th century. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS or 3 s.h. humanities.
  
  •  

    ELIT 270 - Shakespeare 3 s.h.


    Selected plays representing various dramatic types and stages in the author's development. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 272 - 17th-Century English Literature 3 s.h.


    A study of the main poets and prose writers of the period. Special attention to Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Jonson, Herrick, Bacon, and the styles they represent. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 ; LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 273 - Milton 3 s.h.


    John Milton's Paradise Lost is one of the most beautiful works in English Literature, and necessary for understanding later literary movements such as romanticism. Milton's version of Satan was an influential model for both Blake's poetry and Shelley's monster in Frankenstein. Milton's version of Eve sill provokes controversy in discussions of gender and religion. However, Milton was also a radical political figure who supported the execution of monarchs in his work Eikonoklastes ("Icon Breaker") and wrote on educational theory, divorce, and free speech. We will spend the bulk of the semester reading Paradise Lost, examining its complex poetry and its religious and political rhetoric. We will also read other works such as Samson Agonistes, Lycidas, and selections from Milton's prose writing. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 ; LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 274 - Modern British Poets 3 s.h.


    This course examines the poetry of the modern period (ca. 1890-1945) in Britain, situating it in relation to social, historical and literary contexts, such as the two world wars and the tension between modernity and tradition. Later poets may also be included. A-E Only. Offered every 2-3 years.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 , and LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 275 - Jane Austen 3 s.h.


    An intensive reading of novels such as Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma. Additional, related readings will cover topics such as Austen's biography, criticism, the history of the novel, and contemporary literary developments. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 , and LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 287 - From Romance to Gothic 3 s.h.


    The novel has always been closely tied to ideas about women, and this class will trace the history of a genre with a focus on gender. The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the novel as either a teaching method or a dangerous distraction for women and young people, and we will examine the ways women writers navigated scandal and respectability in the romances of authors will Aphra Behn, in the sentimental and comic novel, and works of gothic terror by novelists like Ann Radcliffe. At the same time, we will look at the social, economic, and cultural conditions surrounding publishing, women's rights, and marriage through essays and journalism by writers such as Mary Astell, Eliza Haywood, and Mary Wollstonecraft. A-E Only. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Cross-listed as WMST 287 .
    Prerequisite(s): LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 294 - Special Topics in English Literature 3 s.h.


    Offered according to interest of instructor, requests by students, and availability of instructor. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; 6 s.h. ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
  
  •  

    ELIT 299 - Independent Study in English Literature 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Special studies under department supervision for students who have shown unusual ability in English and other areas. May be continued in successive semesters. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 COMP 200  or COMP 290 ; LITR 150 ; or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ELIT 361 - The Brontes 3 s.h.


    Covers novels by each of the Bronte sisters, such as Agnes GrayVilletteJane Eyre, and Wuthering Heights. Students will refine their close reading and analytical abilities while learning literary and critical terminology and historical and cultural context. Three essays, a presentation, and reading quizzes. A-E Only. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 100 , and LITR 100  or LITR 150 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 364 - Dickens 3 s.h.


    Consideration of Dickens as a novelist and as a critic of society, with close reading of selected novels such as Bleak House, Great Expectations, and The Old Curiosity Shop. A-E Only. Offered every 2-3 years.
    Prerequisite(s): JrS.
  
  •  

    ELIT 370 - Chaucer 3 s.h.


    Study of Chaucer's development in scope, thought, and technique. Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): LITR 100  or LITR 150 ; COMP 200  or COMP 290 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 371 - Shakespeare and Culture 3 s.h.


    This seminar course is designed for students who wish to immerse themselves more fully in reading and analyzing a particular aspect of Shakespeare's plays.  We will focus closely on three plays and consider how the plays intersect with a number of contentious issues in both early modern and postmodern cultures.  Topics may range from legal and gender issues, to religion and the stage, to sexual and racial identity issues.  In addition, we will view film versions, where available, considering how these films contribute to the ongoing reinvention of Shakespeare in our present day culture. Pass/Fail Option. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): LITR 150 , ELIT 270  with a "C" or better, and COMP 200  or COMP 290 .
  
  •  

    ELIT 394 - Special Topics in English Literature 3 s.h.


    Pass/Fail Option. Offered according to interest of instructor, requests by students, and availability of instructor.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): LITR 150 ; LITR 250 ; COMP 200  or COMP 290 ; 6 s.h. ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
  
  •  

    ELIT 399 - Independent Study in English Literature 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Special studies under department supervision for students who have shown unusual ability in English and other areas. May be continued in successive semesters. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): LITR 150 ; LITR 250 ; COMP 200  or COMP 290 ; 6 s.h. ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.

English Education

  
  •  

    ENED 336 - Literature for the Young Adult 3 s.h.


    Students share and discuss works appropriate for middle and high school students, from a variety of genres, authors, and cultures.  Theories and research about teaching practices for literature are also considered.  Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS and Adol. Ed. English Major.
  
  •  

    ENED 392 - Research, Theory and Practice in Middle and High School English Education 4 s.h.


    Presents a mix of traditional and contemporary methods for teaching English in grades 7-12. Theory and research in English teaching form the basis for the methods studied. Course includes a minimum of 52 hours field placement in a middle or high school English classroom. A-E Only. Offered Fall only.
    Prerequisite(s): Candidate status in Education required.
  
  •  

    ENED 396 - Student Teaching in Secondary English 12 s.h.


    One half semester of guided teaching at a middle school and one half semester of guided teaching at a high school. Students must register and successfully complete both ENED 396A and ENED 396B in the same semester to receive credit for either. Pass/Fail Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    OCS
    BC3
    Prerequisite(s): ENED 392  and student teaching eligibility and permission from the Office of Education Advisement and Field Experience required.
    Corequisite(s): ENED 398 .
  
  •  

    ENED 398 - Seminar in Middle and High School English Education 3 s.h.


    A capstone course that overlaps student teaching and includes a review of recent developments in content education at the local, state, national, and international levels as reflected in current educational theory, research, and practice; reflection on curriculum and assessment in light of student teaching experiences; discussion of the Professional Code of Ethics for educators and the role of the educational professional leader; as well as the development and presentation of a professional educational portfolio. Pass/Fail Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    Corequisite(s): ENED 396A, ENED 396B.

Engineering

  
  •  

    ENGR 110 - Introduction to Engineering 1 s.h.


    This course is designed to give students some understanding of the role of engineering in today's society, and of engineering as a professional career. Some specific topics will be: the development of engineering and its historic contributions to society; modern engineering topics; skills needed by engineers; similarities and differences between science and engineering. Skills such as spatial relations and sketching will be developed. Basic computer skills (word processing and other communications uses) and mathematical skills will be reviewed. Technical writing will be introduced. In addition, there will be frequent discussion of the challenges facing first-year students in the 3-2 engineering program. Recommended for all physics majors and first-year students interested in the 3-2 engineering program. A-E Only. Offered Fall only.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 203  or concurrent.
  
  •  

    ENGR 214 - Statics 4 s.h.


    Forces, moments, and couples using vector approach; equilibrium; equivalent force system; friction; force analysis of trusses. Normal and shear stresses; stress-strain relations; shear and bending moment in beams; stress analysis on computer by using finite element software. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 203  and MATH 276  completed or concurrent.
  
  •  

    ENGR 310 - Analytical Mechanics/Dynamics 4 s.h.


    Vector operations; kinematics and dynamics of a particle; the harmonic oscillator; conservative force fields; systems of particles; energy and momentum methods; noninertial reference systems; introduction to dynamics of rigid bodies; motion analysis using software. Pass/Fail Option.
    Cross-listed with PHYS 310 .
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 203 ; MATH 277  completed or concurrent.
  
  •  

    ENGR 313 - Engineering CAD/CAM 2 s.h.


    Reviews techniques for geometric constructions and introduces routines for scaling, manipulating, and labeling through computer programming and use of software. Incorporates engineering applications into drawings and introduces manufacturing techniques. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Spring only.
    Prerequisite(s): CSCI 113 or 114 or CSCI 116 , and 4 s.h. of 200- or 300-level ENGR courses.
  
  •  

    ENGR 315 - Strength of Materials 4 s.h.


    Mechanical properties of engineering materials, deformation, stress, and strain. Poisson's ratio; combined biaxial stresses and strains; torsion; shear force and bending moment; stresses and deflections in beams; column analysis; fundamentals of finite element method and stress analysis on computer by using finite element software. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Spring only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGR 214 ; MATH 277  completed or concurrent.
  
  •  

    ENGR 335 - Electronics/Circuits I 4 s.h.


    Analysis of linear, lumped parameter electrical systems, including study of DC circuits and problems involving transients. Operational amplifiers. Introduction to semiconductors, diodes, transistors, and digital gates. Laboratory experience, including writing technical reports. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    Cross-listed with PHYS 335 .
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 204 ; MATH 276  completed or concurrent.
  
  •  

    ENGR 338 - Electric Circuits II 4 s.h.


    Continuation of ENGR 335  with review of transistor circuits and study of AC circuits, including Sinusoidal Steady-State Analysis, Balanced Three-Phase Circuits, Mutual Inductance, Laplace Transforms, and Filtering Circuits. Laboratory experience. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Spring only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGR 335  or PHYS 335 ; MATH 277  completed or concurrent.
  
  •  

    ENGR 342 - Transport Phenomena 3 s.h.


    Discusses transport phenomena, including momentum, mass, and heat transfer. Emphasizes molecular transport, the equation of change, viscous laminar flow, boundary layer theory, turbulent transport, and simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Pass/Fail Option.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 351 .
  
  •  

    ENGR 399 - Independent Study in Engineering 1 s.h. - 3 s.h.


    Independent studies under faculty supervision. Pass/Fail Option.
    Prerequisite(s): JrS, 8 s.h. 300-level ENGR courses; permission of ENGR coordinator and instructor.

Environmental Sciences

  
  •  

    ENVS 101 - Introduction to Environmental Science 3 s.h.


    The interactions between the living and non-living components of the ecosystem. An introduction to ecological community concepts; the influence of chemical, geological, atmospheric, and physical factors on living systems will be considered. A-E Only.
    LA
    NS3
  
  •  

    ENVS 105 - Research and Careers in Environmental Sustainability 1 s.h.


    This course is intended for Environmental Science majors in their first year. The course involves numerous field trips to local sites where discussion on relevant environmental issues will take place. It is expected that students are either currently in either ENVS 101  or ENVS 201  or that students have had the equivalent of one of these courses. A-E Only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENVS or ENSS majors only.
  
  •  

    ENVS 110 - Environmental Sustainability 3 s.h.


    The Brundtland Commission in 1987 defined "sustainability" as "meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." Environmental Sustainability uses a holistic approach to understanding the complex nature of the environment, especially where the social institutions interact with natural phenomena. Lectures, readings, and discussions examine both the role and limits of natural resources and the environment in relation to human political, social, and economic goals and aspirations. Students gain a greater appreciation of how science can inform the policies and practices that will shape a more sustainable future. A-E Only.
    LA
    SUSF
    NS3
  
  •  

    ENVS 201 - Environmental Issues 3 s.h.


    The study of the effect of human activities on the worldwide ecosystem. An examination of the issues of human overpopulation, atmospheric warming, chemical pollution, and agriculture. Strategies of land planning and resource conservation will be considered. A-E Only. Offered Spring only.
    LA
    Cross-listed as: GEOG 206 .
    Prerequisite(s): ENVS 101  or ENVS 110 
  
  •  

    ENVS 250 - Environmental Monitoring 3 s.h.


    Introduction to various methods and techniques commonly used in the field of environmental science to monitor nature. Emphasis is on designing statistically sound monitoring programs and applying learned statistical tests to analyze data. A-E Only.
    SUSF
    Prerequisite(s): ENVS 201  and STAT 101 , both "C+" or better.
  
  •  

    ENVS 251 - Food, Society and the Environment 3 s.h.


    Food is a critical aspect of human existence and its production and distribution lies at the core of the interaction between society and the environment. This course adopts a critical approach to examining the current issues and debates pertaining to the production, processing and marketing of food as well as the local and global political economy of access to food. A central theme in these discussions will be the challenge of environmental sustainability in the food production and distribution system, while drawing examples from the local, national and global levels. The course will examine the political economy of the global food system as well as the local and national food justice issues that include production, access and consumption. A-E Only.
    LA
    SUSF
    Cross-listed with GEOG 251  and SOC 251 .
    Prerequisite(s): ENVS 101 , ENVS 110 GEOG 100 , or SOC 101 .
  
  •  

    ENVS 264 - Environmental Inequalities 3 s.h.


    This course will examine the range of issues that link social inequality to geographically situated environmental injustices. Differential exposures lead to uneven health and quality-of-life outcomes along racial, ethnic, and social class lines.  A-E Only. Offered annually.
    GEOG 264  and SOC 264 
    Prerequisite(s): 3 s.h. of ENVS, GEOG, SOC, or CRJ.
  
  •  

    ENVS 268 - United States Environmental History 3 s.h.


    Study of the history of environmental perception in the United States, from 15th - 21st centuries. Topics include settlement patterns, land management policies, environmental degradation and disasters, and the environmental movement. Concepts include nationalism, expansionism, romanticism, conservation, "wilderness," the "Land Ethic," environmental justice, ecotourism, ecosystem services, and sustainability. Special emphasis on Adirondack Park. A-E Only.
    LA
    SUSF
    Cross-listed as: GEOG 268 .
    Prerequisite(s): GEOG 100  or ENVS 101  or ENVS 110  or SoS.
  
  •  

    ENVS 291 - Interdisciplinary Junior Seminar 3 s.h.


    This is a seminar course for Environmental Sustainability majors. The focus of this course in particular is to progressively develop the trans-disciplinary analytical skills that empower students to develop creative and collaborative solutions to complex environmental challenges. Students will be asked to integrate and frame knowledge in new ways. A-E Only.
    LA
    SUSF
    Prerequisite(s): JrS, ENVS or ENSS major.
  
  •  

    ENVS 294 - Special Topics in Environmental Sciences 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    This course gives students the opportunity to study in depth advanced and special topics in the field of environmental sciences. Topics and instructors will be announced prior to registration. Pass/Fail Only.
  
  •  

    ENVS 299 - Independent Study in Environmental Sciences 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Individual studies under regular faculty supervision. Enrollment by consent of program director and instructor. Pass/Fail Only.
  
  •  

    ENVS 385 - Water and the Environment of Guatemala 3 s.h.


    This international field course prepares students to find solutions to contemporary water resources problems and environmental issues in the developing world. Water and the Environment of Guatemala largely focuses on the water resources of Lake Atitlan and its watershed. Students will take water samples and analyze water quality data from Lake Atitlan and the surrounding drainage basin. Based on observations, interactions with local residents, and data collection, students will identify sustainable solutions to local water resources problems. Students will also be exposed to Guatemala's natural systems, from volcanoes and climate, to soils and biomes. This is an experiential course and active participation is required for successful completion. Permission of the instructor is required. Students must have a valid passport. Enrollment is limited and students must apply to participate during the preceding Fall semester. There is a special course cost associated with this class. A-E Only. This course will be offered during the Summer Semester.
    LA
    Cross-Listed as: GEOG 385  and GEOL 385 .
    Prerequisite(s): JrS and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ENVS 390 - Environmental Sustainability Seminar 3 s.h.


    This course serves as a capstone course for the Environmental Sustainability major.  The course focuses on contemporary issues in environmental sciences and sustainability. Students are required to produce a synthesis evaluation of a particular topic, including data analysis and presentations. Group research projects or primary literature readings will be required. Evaluations will be based on participation and quality of products. A-E Only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SrS; ENVS 250  "B" or better, and ENVS 291 
  
  •  

    ENVS 397 - Environmental Internship 1 - 15 s.h.


    Practical experience with an appropriate organization or agency. Students are required to submit a journal of their experiences at the end of the internship. Requirements follow College internship policies. Only one internship can count as an elective towards the major. A-E Only.
    Prerequisite(s): JrS.
  
  •  

    ENVS 399 - Independent Study in Environmental Sciences 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Individual studies and research under regular faculty supervision. Enrollment by consent of program director and instructor. Pass/Fail Option.

Educational Psychology

  
  •  

    EPSY 120 - Improving College Study Skills 3 s.h.


    The purpose of the course is to provide students with a total system for effective studying derived from research-based principles. Topics include: memory and learning strategies, motivational and time management techniques, self-regulation strategies, including effective help-seeking strategies; study strategies, including methods for note-taking, critical reading and thinking; strategies for completing group work, including navigation of group dynamics; test-taking techniques, including strategies for managing test anxiety; and techniques for preparing and delivering effective oral presentations. A major focus of the course is assisting students in applying these techniques to their regular courses. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    BC3
  
  •  

    EPSY 229 - Survey of Exceptional Children 3 s.h.


    Studies the cognitive, emotional, social, physical, and motivational characteristics and educational requirements of exceptional children, focusing on students in N-12 settings. Reviews historical and political foundations of exceptional education. Exceptionalities at both ends of the continuum are examined. Field experience will be required. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    SS3
    Prerequisite(s): EPSY 275  and EPSY 240  or EPSY 250 .
  
  •  

    EPSY 240 - Child Growth and Development 3 s.h.


    This course focuses on the study of human development from infancy through early adolescence, including physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects. This course also addresses the application of theories and research of child development to educational contexts. Field experiences are required.   A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
  
  •  

    EPSY 250 - Adolescent Growth and Development 3 s.h.


    Physical, intellectual, moral, social, and emotional development of youth, with emphasis on adjustment and learning, attitudes, interests, and problems of the home, school, and community. Field experiences and/or service experiences required. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    SS3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    EPSY 275 - Psychological Foundations of Education: Learning and Motivation 3 s.h.


    Studies the relationship of research to educational decision making and instruction; studies behavioral, cognitive, motivational and conceptual principles and practices derived from research and applied to educational decision making and instruction. All outcomes are also applied to helping students become self-regulated learners. Field experiences and/or service experiences required. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    EPSY 280 - Assessment 3 s.h.


    Studies the multiple assessment approaches used in education to meet varied individual, group, and program needs, focusing on N–12 settings. Special attention is given to examining the quality of these approaches using the criteria of reliability, validity, and practicality. Coverage includes traditional teacher-made tests, feedback and error analysis strategies, standardized tests, non-traditional assessment alternatives, and an examination of assessment instruments, procedures, and accommodations used to meet the needs of students with disabilities. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    EPSY 310 - Classroom Behavior Management in Middle School 3 s.h.


    This course examines various methods and models of classroom management in the middle school and their use with both general education and special education populations. These methods and models also apply to earlier and later grade levels. Topics addressed include causes of behavior problems, preventing behavior problems, and designing classroom management systems. A-E Only. Offered Spring only.
    Prerequisite(s): SoS and EPSY 275 .
  
  •  

    EPSY 399 - Independent Study in Educational Psychology 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved. Pass/Fail Option.
    Prerequisite(s): JrS and 9 s.h. in EPSY.

Earth Science

  
  •  

    ESCI 100 - Introduction to the Earth 3 s.h.


    An introduction to the earth sciences; concepts developed in astronomy, geology, geophysics, meteorology, and oceanography. Lecture only. Credit cannot be applied toward science requirement in any science major in Liberal Arts or Secondary Education. Students who have had high school earth science should consider other introductory earth science classes. A-E Only.
    LA
    NS3
  
  •  

    ESCI 110 - Introduction to Oceanography 3 s.h.


    An introduction to the basic concepts of ocean science, including sub-disciplines of geology, biology, chemistry, and physical oceanography, and emphasizing the relationships of man with the ocean. Covers present and potential (non-living) resources of the ocean, as well as pollution and politics involving man's use of the ocean. Intended for non-science students and assumes little or no background in any of the disciplines covered. A-E Only. Offered every Fall semester.
    LA
    NS3
  
  •  

    ESCI 200 - Investigations in Earth and Planetary Science 4 s.h.


    An exploration of science as inquiry, focusing on the unifying concepts and processes of science as applied to planet Earth. The specific Earth Science content from the K-4 and 5-8 levels of the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996) will be rigorously and comprehensively explored. Laboratory activities will model science as inquiry, with students engaged in a variety of directed and open-ended investigations of selected Earth and planetary science phenomena and topics. This course is intended primarily for Elementary Education majors, but is open to all students. Content and instruction are consistent with the NSES, NSTA Standards and New York's MST Learning Standards. A-E Only.
    LA
    NS3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS and EDUC 106 .
  
  •  

    ESCI 215 - Earth Materials 4 s.h.


    This course provides an overview of the physical and chemical properties, origins, and geologic settings of the major categories of earth materials: minerals, rocks, and geofluids. It includes development of hands-on skills in mineral and rock identification and textural analysis at hand-specimen scale. It is intended for liberal arts Earth Science, Adolescent Education Earth Science, and Environmental Earth Science majors. A-E Only. Offered Spring only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 120  or GEOL 115  or GEOL 150  or GEOL 182 .
  
  •  

    ESCI 295 - Teaching Assistantship in Earth Science 1 s.h. - 2 s.h.


    Provides college-level experience as an assistant to the teaching faculty. Student assistants will serve directly under faculty supervision, with responsibilities such as tutoring, as well as assistance in laboratory classes, review sessions, field trips, laboratory set-up, and administration of classroom functions (e.g., taking attendance, setting up AV facilities). The teaching assistantship may be repeated as ESCI 395 , but with a 3-credit maximum combined total for both courses. Credit can be applied toward earth science elective categories. Pass/Fail Only.
    Prerequisite(s): JrS or SrS, major in an Earth Sciences field, minimum GPA 2.5, permission of instructor and chair.
  
  •  

    ESCI 299 - Independent Study in Earth Science 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS and prior course(s) in earth sciences.
  
  •  

    ESCI 315 - Laboratory Techniques in Earth Science 2 s.h.


    The selection, preparation, maintenance, and proper use of laboratory equipment and supplies in earth science; application of technologies in the earth science laboratory, practice in developing demonstrations and presentation of topics; planning of inquiry-based laboratory exercises. A-E Only. Offered Spring only.
    Prerequisite(s): JrS and 6 s.h. in approved earth sciences.
  
  •  

    ESCI 395 - Teaching Assistantship in Earth Science 1 s.h. - 2 s.h.


    Provides college-level experience as an assistant to the teaching faculty. Student assistants will serve directly under faculty supervision, with responsibilities such as tutoring, as well as assistance in laboratory classes, review sessions, field trips, laboratory set-up, and administration of classroom functions (e.g., taking attendance, setting up AV facilities). There is a 3-credit maximum combined total for ESCI 295  and ESCI 395. Credit can be applied toward earth science elective categories. Pass/Fail Only.
    Prerequisite(s): JrS or SrS, major in an Earth Sciences field, minimum GPA 2.5, permission of instructor and chair, ESCI 295 .
  
  •  

    ESCI 398 - Senior Thesis in Earth Science 3 s.h.


    Individual research under faculty supervision in disciplines of geology, meteorology, or earth science. Enrollment by consent of department chair and instructor involved. A thesis is likely to require more than one semester to complete. A-E Only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SrS and permission of instructor and department chair.
  
  •  

    ESCI 399 - Independent Study in Earth Science 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): JrS and prior courses in earth sciences.

English as a Second Language

  
  •  

    ESL 090 - Individualized ESL Practice 1 s.h.


    A five-week mini-course providing individualized instruction and support in the full spectrum of English-language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing).
  
  •  

    ESL 109 - Summer ESL Speaking/Listening 2 s.h.


    This is an ESL speaking/listening course specially designed for a summer "bridge" program meant to strengthen the English skills of international students admitted to the college. This course will address spoken-language skills in the context of the college-level academic environment. A-E Only.
    LA
  
  •  

    ESL 110 - Summer ESL Reading/Writing 3 s.h.


    This is an ESL reading/writing course specially designed for a summer "bridge" program meant to strengthen the English skills of international students admitted to the college. This course will address college-level reading comprehension and academic writing. A-E Only.
    LA
  
  •  

    ESL 124 - Intensive ESL Reading 1 s.h. - 3 s.h.


    Integrated reading for English as a Second Language (ESL) students at the intermediate level. Designed to help international and other ESL students improve their skills in reading and speaking English for success in college classes; students taking this course may take ESL 125  in the same semester.  Pass/Fail Option. Offered fall only.
    LA
  
  •  

    ESL 125 - Intensive ESL Writing 1 s.h. - 3 s.h.


    Intensive writing for English as a Second Language students at the intermediate level. Designed to help international and other ESL students improve their skills in writing and speaking English for success in college classes; students taking this course may take ESL 124  in the same semester. Pass/Fail Option. Offered fall only.
    LA
  
  •  

    ESL 165 - Continuing ESL I 1 s.h. - 3 s.h.


    Intensive practice of spoken and written English at the college level, in the context of the students' other academic classes. A-E Only. Offered in the fall semesters, may be taken after ESL 166 .
  
  •  

    ESL 166 - Continuing ESL II 1 s.h. - 3 s.h.


    Intensive practice on spoken and written English at the college level, in the context of the students' other academic classes. May be taken before ESL 165 .  Pass/Fail Option. Offered spring only.
    LA
  
  •  

    ESL 299 - Independent Study in ESL 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Individual study of ESL reading and/or writing under faculty supervision. May be repeated with different topics. Pass/Fail Option.
    (LA)

Family

  
  •  

    FAMS 160 - Family Perspectives 3 s.h.


    An analysis of family living as product of culture, philosophy, and time. Relationships of families to other systems such as work, education, government, and religion are studied. Opportunity to understand this social experience through an examination of past and present families in other cultures and American. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    SS3
  
  •  

    FAMS 205 - Marriage and Family Relationships 3 s.h.


    This course focuses on important issues in marriage and family relationships. Topics such as dating, friendship, mate selection, gender roles, marital adjustment, parenthood, and healthy family functioning will be included. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    SS3
  
  •  

    FAMS 210 - Research Methods in Child and Family Studies 3 s.h.


    This course develops basic skills in the ability to understand and evaluate research in the field of child and family studies. The research process of developing and conducting empirical quantitative and qualitative research is explored, particularly in relation to assessing human and family development. Attention is given to developing program evaluation studies in child family studies and human services.  Emphasis will be placed on the use of APA style in citing and reviewing scholarly research. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    FAMS 220 - Human Relations and Sexuality 3 s.h.


    This course will examine sexual development, human reproduction, sexual functioning, and acquisition of gender identity in the context of family and interpersonal relationships. This course will also focus on the exploration of human sexuality over the lifecycle. A-E Only. Offered Spring only.
  
  •  

    FAMS 250 - Group Work in Human Services 3 s.h.


    This course will help students develop an understanding of how to establish and facilitate therapeutic, educational and support groups in the human services fields. Class sessions will include lectures, discussions, simulations, role-plays, and experiential exercises. A-E Only. Offered Fall only.
    Prerequisite(s): SoS; FAMS 160  or SOC 101  or PSYC 100 
 

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