Jun 12, 2021  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Listings


SUNY Oneonta offers students more than 1,400 courses—from Accounting to Zoology—from over 25 separate departments. Requirements for majors and minors and course descriptions are listed under the departments that offer them, and these departments are arranged in alphabetical order.

Please note that requirements, courses, and course descriptions are subject to change after publication of this catalog. Contact the appropriate departments for updated information. Also note that some course listings have been edited for clarity and consistency. Complete listings are available from the instructors or the departments concerned.

Key to Course Listings

Abbreviation   Meaning
(PACT)   Activity course in Health & Fitness
(LA)   Liberal Arts (course is a Liberal Arts offering)
OCS   Oral Communication Skills
SUSF   Sustainability Focused Courses
s.h.   Semester Hour(s)
SoS   Sophomore standing
JrS   Junior standing
SrS   Senior standing

Course Numbering System

001 - 099   No credit; usually developmental in nature.
100 - 199   Lower-division undergraduate-level courses.
200 - 299   Upper-division intermediate undergraduate-level courses.
300 - 399   Upper-division advanced courses.
500 - 699   Graduate-level courses.
 

Philosophy

  
  •  

    PHIL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy 3 s.h.


    Provides an overview of philosophy and its relation to other fields of study. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    H3
  
  •  

    PHIL 102 - Ethics 3 s.h.


    Examines moral values in relation to human behavior. An account of the three basic aspects of moral thinking (descriptive, normative, and critical). The status and justification of moral judgments and the meaning of ethical terms such as virtue, duty, good, happiness, and right. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    BC3
    H3
  
  •  

    PHIL 103 - Critical Thinking 3 s.h.


    A study of the forms of valid reasoning. An examination of typical fallacies which arise from the use of language. Consideration of deductive and inductive inferences. Analysis of propositions, syllogisms, validity, invalidity, analogy, hypotheses, etc. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    BC3
    H3
  
  •  

    PHIL 104 - Philosophical Ideas in Imaginative Literature 3 s.h.


    An examination of literary expression of philosophical ideas. The human condition, man's relationship to himself, to others, to the world; happiness, freedom, time, transcendence, love, death, absurdity. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    H3
  
  •  

    PHIL 105 - Business Ethics 3 s.h.


    The relation of economic values to other values such as health, environmental quality, freedom, justice, equality, self-realization, and the quality of work. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    H3
  
  •  

    PHIL 107 - Philosophies of Art 3 s.h.


    Traditional and contemporary theories of art and aesthetic experience. Problems of description, meaning, interpretation, and evaluation in the arts. Pass/Fail Option. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    H3
  
  •  

    PHIL 115 - Survey of World Religions 3 s.h.


    A critical survey of the world's major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Both the philosophical and socio-cultural manifestations of these religions will be studied. Particular attention will be given to the basic tenets, history, values, and impact of each religion on the development of the major world civilization. A-E Only.
    LA
    H3
    Cross-listed as RELG 115 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 160 - Urban Philosophical Dilemmas 3 s.h.


    This course is designed to answer questions relevant to urban America, questions that have been largely ignored by academic philosophers. For instance: Is it morally wrong to snitch on your friends? If you're from "the hood" (whatever that might be), is it morally/politically/socially wrong to want to leave it? What are the epistemological assumptions of keepin' it real (or is this just an empty rehetorical phrase)? If you're out to get bling bling, are you contributing to the capitalist system that often oppresses the traditionally underrepresented? At what point do artists and musicians stop being gritty and raw and start being parodies and stereotypes? A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    OCS
    BC3
    H3
    Cross-Listed as: ALS 160 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 201 - Theories of Knowledge 3 s.h.


    Analysis of the epistemic theories of Plato, Hume, Kant, and Goodman. Concepts include belief, truth, justification, perception, and knowledge. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    BC3
    Prerequisite(s): 6 s.h. PHIL.
  
  •  

    PHIL 202 - Metaphysics 3 s.h.


    Examination of metaphysical concepts and systems, both Eastern and Western, classical and contemporary. Topics include the structure and composition of reality, historical change, quality, love, technology, values, and modern science. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Spring only.
    LA
    BC3
    Prerequisite(s): 3 s.h. PHIL.
  
  •  

    PHIL 204 - The Literature and Philosophy of Alienation 3 s.h.


    Study of the intellectual bases of alienation in philosophy and literature. Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Camus, and Beckett are among the writers considered. Pass/Fail Option. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 205 - Philosophy and Psychology of Yoga 3 s.h.


    An analysis of the philosophical basis, psychological content and practical method of Patanjali's Yoga. Discussion centers on the meaning, aim, method, accomplishment of Yoga, as well as on the practice of physical, breathing, and psychological exercises and on the three stages of concentration. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 206 - Philosophy of Life and Death 3 s.h.


    Philosophical examination of life and death. Topics include the meaning of life, the nature of death, the morality of suicide, the ethics of euthanasia, the rights of the terminally ill, and the possibility of life after death. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    BC3
    Prerequisite(s): 3 s.h. PHIL.
  
  •  

    PHIL 210 - Symbolic Logic 3 s.h.


    Considers the principles and techniques of modern logic. The development of standard notation and techniques used in determining validity and invalidity of arguments. The study of basic logical concepts and truth functions to develop quantification theory and proof of "natural deduction." Pass/Fail Option. Offered Spring only.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 211 - Philosophy of Science 3 s.h.


    Philosophical examination of the methods, structure, theories, and presuppositions of modern science. Topics include objectivity, explanation, prediction, revolution, progress, and the proper relation of science and religion. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    BC3
    Prerequisite(s): 3 s.h. PHIL or science.
  
  •  

    PHIL 212 - Social and Political Philosophy 3 s.h.


    Analyzes fundamental social and political concepts, including justice, state, equality, opportunity, rights, obligations, sovereignty, and freedom. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    WC3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 213 - Philosophy of History and Culture 3 s.h.


    The philosophical study of civilization, both past and present. Topics include the nature of history, the structure of historical and cultural change, the applicability and limitations of the scientific method, the nature and possibility of objectivity, and the role and significance of the individual. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): 3 s.h. PHIL, HIST or ANTH.
  
  •  

    PHIL 214 - Philosophy of Religion 3 s.h.


    Philosophical study of both Eastern and Western religions. Examines epistemic and metaphysical presuppositions of religions, including the influence of modern science. Analysis of belief, truth, symbolism, and the limits of language. Pass/Fail Option. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    BC3
    Prerequisite(s): 3 s.h. PHIL.
  
  •  

    PHIL 220 - History of Philosophy 1: Ancient Philosophical Thought 3 s.h.


    A historical consideration of the most significant philosophies in Western Civilization, from Thales to St. Augustine. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
  
  •  

    PHIL 221 - History of Philosophy II: Modern Philosophical Thought 3 s.h.


    An historical consideration of the most significant philosophies in Western Civilization, from Aquinas to Kant. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    BC3
    WC3
  
  •  

    PHIL 230 - Environmental Ethics 3 s.h.


    Application of ethical concepts to current environmental problems. Issues include the defense of the environment and difficulties involved in changing people's attitudes toward nature. Concepts include human responsibility, animal rights, value-neutral science, the role of technology, sustainability, law, politics, beauty, and the role of religion. A-E Only. Offered Fall and Spring.
    LA
    OCS
    BC3
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 231 - Media Ethics 3 s.h.


    Application of ethical concepts to issues surrounding contemporary media and its use, especially TV and video. Questions concern the portrayal of violence, sex, crime, and truth in advertising. Students will be challenged to acquire theoretical knowledge concerning ethics and a sensitivity for the application of that knowledge. Literature, textbook assignments, case studies and video presentations. Students will be encouraged to explore connections between modern mass-media and the moral standards of the society in which we live. A-E Only. Offered Spring only.
    LA
    OCS
    BC3
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 232 - Philosophy of Law 3 s.h.


    Legally interested students are introduced to an overview of the theoretical questions involved in the study of the philosophy of law. Legal and philosophical thought are intertwined, yet the rules for responsible application of the law remain disputable. Questions of foundation in the Western tradition range from Thomas Aquinas' development of a Just War theory until H.L.A. Hart's distinction between moral and legal standards, and question of Globalization, Social Justice and Interpretation. Students will develop independent reasoning skills and understand the foundations of current legal debates. The course will explore different legal schools of thought from Plato until the present, and compare with non-Western legal traditions (tribal/Islamic). In doing so, it lays the foundation for those students of the liberal arts who wish to pursue a further career in legal (or copy- right related), political, sociological, philosophical studies or criminal justice. Especially interesting for, but not limited to, students already involved in pre-law studies. The course is reading, speech and writing intensive. Pass/Fail Option. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    OCS
    BC3
    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 103 , SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 235 - Existentialism 3 s.h.


    Analysis and evaluation of existentialism, with emphasis on the writings of Kierkegaard, Husserl, Heideggar, Sartre, Camus, and Merleau-Ponty. Pass/Fail Option. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    H3
    Prerequisite(s): 3 s.h. PHIL.
  
  •  

    PHIL 245 - Feminist Philosophy 3 s.h.


    A survey of feminist philosophy. The course explores issues of gender differences and some of the ways of conceiving female (and male) identity. It introduces specific areas of feminist theory, examining a variety of political/ethical theories that fall under the umbrella of feminism. A-E Only.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 247 - Environmental Humanities 3 s.h.


    This is a lecture and discussion course that explores the various ways that the humanities help us understand the relationship between humans and the environment. Insights from literature, philosophy, religious studies, and the arts will be employed in this endeavor. To achieve sustainability we need to explore human values, perceptions, beliefs, fears, and cultural inclinations in shaping humanity's relationship to the natural world and human landscapes we have created. A deep understanding of the humanities and humanistic methodologies is a necessary component of the interdisciplinary solution of environmental problems we face such as global climate change and loss of biodiversity. A-E Only. Offered annually.
    LA
    Cross-listed as LITR 247 .
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 250 - Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism 3 s.h.


    Survey of ancient Indian and Chinese thought including the Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, Samkhya, Yoga, Buddism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    OW3
  
  •  

    PHIL 251 - Mysticism and Meditation in India and Chinese Tradition 3 s.h.


    Explores mystical patterns of thought in the Indian and Chinese tradition including: Ramakrishna, Vivekananda, Tagore, Gandhi, and Ghose together with recent Hindu movements in the West. Pass/Fail Option. Offered Fall only.
    LA
    OW3
  
  •  

    PHIL 258 - Latin American Political Theory 3 s.h.


    This course is a survey of the various political ideologies associated with Latin America. We will begin with the colonization of the Americas by the Europeans and end with the Liberation Theology movement in the 1990's. The course will place great significance on the Latin American struggle for recognition (and freedom) from Europe, as well as the United States. We will also spend considerable time considering issues such as colonialism (and post-colonialism), the slave trade, the decimation of the native populations, the various Christian missionary creeds, and the impact of the Europeans on the environment. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    BC3
    OW3
    Cross-Listed as: ALS 258 .
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 259 - Citizenship, Democracy, and Identity 3 s.h.


    This course considers the relationship between citizenship, democracy, and identity. We will examine what constitutes citizenship and how it is shaped by race, but also ethnicity, gender, class, and religion; how identity is constituted and shaped by race and these other contingent and non-contingent factors; and how citizenship and identity intersect in a democracy through forms of legitimate political representation, means of communication and participation, protest, pluralism, multiculturalism, identity politics, and voting. This course is encouraged for those considering careers in public affairs, international relations, social work, journalism, law, business, or education. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    BC3
    H3
    Cross-listed as: ALS 259 .
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 260 - Philosophy of Protest 3 s.h.


    This course is meant to examine the philosophical issues involved in the process of protest. Primarily, we will look at the development of a theory of righteous protest that coincides with the rise of democratic governance during the Enlightenment. This then gives rise to the idea of civil disobedience as the proper method for legitimate protest, as opposed to the destructive and damaging means of armed rebellion, as witnessed mainly in the French Revolution. But historical events like John Brown's raid and Nat Turner's rebellion complicate matters. A-E Only. Offered irregularly.
    LA
    OCS
    BC3
    H3
    Cross-Listed as: ALS 260 .
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 269 - Consciousness and Cognition 3 s.h.


    This course introduces vexing issues in philosophy and cognitive psychology. As a survey of theories of the mind, consciousness, and awareness it is relevant for a broad range of fields: cognitive psychology, sensation and perception, philosophy, artificial intelligence, evolutionary biology, biology and psychology. By exploring a multitude of exciting and often contradictory new theories in several different disciplines, we confront the possible uniqueness of humans.  Pass/Fail Option.  Offered annually.
    LA
    PSYC 269 
    Prerequisite(s): One PHIL and one PSYC course.
  
  •  

    PHIL 280 - Bioethics 3 s.h.


    Bioethics is an undergraduate course designed to give students an in-depth understanding of salient ethical, legal, religious and policy issues in bioethics. Readings will be from philosophy, law, and medicine. Students will read and discuss primary literature and specific case studies on a weekly basis. Students will gain an understanding of key issues in bioethics such as: human dignity, moral status, oppression, euthanasia, genetic enhancement, biotechnology, and synthetic biology. A-E Only. Offered annually.
    (LA)
    Prerequisite(s): SoS.
  
  •  

    PHIL 294 - Special Topics in Philosophy 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Variable subject matter, offered on an irregular basis. Topics and instructors to be announced prior to pre-registration each semester.  Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
  
  •  

    PHIL 299 - Independent Study in Philosophy 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chairman and instructor. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): 6 s.h. PHIL.
  
  •  

    PHIL 350 - Contemporary Critical Theory 3 s.h.


    Designed for students preparing for graduate studies in the humanities. Focuses on structuralist and post-structuralist analyses of texts and culture. Overviews of the philosophical foundations and current theoretical considerations of literary formalism, linguistics, and semiotics. Study to include notable figure such as Baudrillard, Husserl, Heidegger, de Saussure, Jakobson, Kristeva, Levi-Struass and Barthes, with literary texts by authors such as Calvino, Eco, Coetzee, Kafka, Woolf and Borges. A-E Only. Offered every 2-3 years.
    LA
    Cross-listed as: LITR 350 .
    Prerequisite(s): JrS, LITR 250  or PHIL 201  or PHIL 213  or by permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PHIL 380 - Philosophy Conference 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Participation in a small group which, under faculty sponsorship and guidance, plans and hosts an Undergraduate Philosophy Conference. Students must demonstrate ability to accept substantial responsibility, work independently, and participate in a shared decision-making process. Specific activities include budgeting, scheduling, arranging facilities and publicity, maintaining a web site, corresponding with participants, evaluating submissions, and editing papers for publication in a volume of selected procedings. Individual registration requires approval of the instructor and department chair. Pass/Fail Only. May be repeated for credit.
    OCS
    BC3
  
  •  

    PHIL 390 - Senior Thesis 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Intensive, independent study under the direction of one or more faculty sponsors. Intended as a capstone experience for philosophy majors. Typically culminates in a polished 30-40 page philosophical essay. Individual registration, which may span two semesters, requires approval of the faculty sponsor(s) and department chair. A-E Only.
    LA
    BC3
  
  •  

    PHIL 395 - Teaching Assistantship 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Provides teaching experience for students majoring in Philosophy. Students work directly under a faculty member. Activities include discussing goals and procedures with instructor, grading quizzes and written assignments, conducting class sessions, and providing tutorial services. Pass/Fail Only. May be repeated for credit with approval of departmental chair.
    Prerequisite(s): 6 s.h. PHIL (including the course for which the student will assist), consent of instructor and department chair.
  
  •  

    PHIL 397 - Internship in Applied Philosophy 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Work experiences that focus on social-political issues, ethical considerations, and topics central to aesthetics or religion draw upon the critical thinking skills required of all Philosophy majors and could serve as an internship. Potential internships include: but are not limited to, work experiences in non-profit organizations, law, public relations, environmental agencies, or museums. Students will search for and select an appropriate internship and must demonstrate how that experience will develop their ability to identify and engage with philosophical issues in the "real" world. The goal of this course is to enhance your philosophical knowledge in an experience outside the traditional classroom. Pass/Fail Only.
    Prerequisite(s): Students must fulfill minimum college-wide requirements and JrS; PHIL major or minor; PHIL 102 ; PHIL 103  or PHIL 210 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 399 - Independent Study in Philosophy 1 s.h. - 6 s.h.


    Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor. Pass/Fail Option.
    LA
    Prerequisite(s): 9 s.h. PHIL.